Untitled Document
Taking a Closer Look at the Stories Ignored by the Corporate Media
Donate | Fair Use Notice | Who We Are | Contact

NEWS
All News
9-11
Corporatism
Disaster in New Orleans
Economics
Environment
Globalization
Government / The Elite
Human Rights
International Affairs
Iraq War
London Bombing
Media
Police State / Military
Science / Health
Voting Integrity
War on Terrorism
Miscellaneous

COMMENTARY
All Commentaries
9-11
CIA
Corporatism
Economics
Government / The Elite
Imperialism
Iraq War
Media
Police State / Military
Science / Health
Voting Integrity
War on Terrorism

SEARCH/ARCHIVES
Advanced Search
View the Archives

E-mail this Link   Printer Friendly

WAR ON TERRORISM -
-

90 % of Terror Arrests Fail

Posted in the database on Friday, June 17th, 2005 @ 02:43:49 MST (1418 views)
by Gary Younge    khilafah.com  

Untitled Document

Fewer than 10% of the people prosecuted for terrorism in the United States since the September 11 attacks were convicted of crimes related to that or national security, according to a study conducted by the Washington Post.

Of those 39 people, few had any connection to al-Qaida while the remaining 90% were acquitted or convicted of lesser crimes such as immigration violations or making false statements, the study shows.

The report emerged as President George Bush travelled the country to encourage Congress to renew the Patriot Act, the controversial attempt to counter terrorism by boosting surveillance powers.

"Federal terrorism investigations have resulted in charges against more than 400 suspects, and more than half of those charge have been convicted," Mr Bush told the Ohio State Highway Patrol Academy on Thursday.

But, according to the Washington Post, the vast majority of those arrested were eventually convicted of only minor violations for which they were either deported or received relatively short sentences.

The median sentence for all of the cases, related to terrorism or not, was 11 months. Of those who were convicted on terrorist charges, most were involved not with al-Qaida but causes and crimes such as Colombian drug cartels, Rwanda's civil war or support for Palestinian groups.

The administration's list does not include those held at Guant?namo Bay or under US jurisdiction elsewhere in the world.

"What we're seeing over time is the equivalent of mission creep," Juliette Kayyem, who heads the national security programme at Harvard University's Kennedy school of government, told the Post. "Cases that would not be terrorism cases before September 11 are swept on to the terrorism docket."

· Senator Mel Martinez said the government should consider closing the Guant?namo Bay prison for terrorism suspects - the first high-profile Republican to make the suggestion.



Go to Original Article >>>

The views expressed herein are the writers' own and do not necessarily reflect those of Looking Glass News. Click the disclaimer link below for more information.
Email: editor@lookingglassnews.org.

E-mail this Link   Printer Friendly




Untitled Document
Disclaimer
Donate | Fair Use Notice | Who We Are | Contact
Copyright 2005 Looking Glass News.